Bloody Sunday campaign says Soldier F trial is not enough

The Bloody Sunday March Committee says there's is no question of it its campaign for truth and justice ending as a result of the trial of Soldier F.

They say while it is to be welcomed that a member of the Parachute Regiment is going on trial for the Bloody Sunday murders, it's not enough, and doesn't do justice to the truth.

In a statement, spokesperson Kate Nash says it appears the British State hopes that the charge against Soldier F will be the end of it, that the campaigning will end.

If that's the case, she says, they have another thing coming.

Ms Nash says the murders on Bloody Sunday didn’t result from a breakdown of discipline on the part of the paras, but were planned and ordered at the highest levels.

She adds while Soldier F deserves to be on trial, he is being thrown to the wolves, and the rest of the pack is being allowed to slink away.

Ms Nash concludes a fraction of the truth is unacceptable, and the Bloody Sunday campaign will continue for as long as it takes.

Statement in full -

**********************

The fact that one member of the Parachute Regiment is going on trial for the Bloody Sunday murders is to be welcomed. But it's not enough. It doesn't do justice to the truth. 

 

The British State hopes that the charge against Soldier F will be the end of it, that we will all call it quits now and call off campaigning. They’ll have another think coming.

 

To put all of the blame on Soldier F would be to shut our eyes to the single most important fact about Bloody Sunday - that the murders didn’t result from a breakdown of discipline on the part of the paras, but were planned and ordered at the highest levels.  

 

Soldier F was a lowly officer, a lance-corporal. No so Derek Wilford, a Lieutenant Colonel. Robert Ford was a General. Harry Tuzo was a Lieutenant General. Michael Jackson was a General. Frank Kitson was a Brigadier. Pat MacClelland was a Brigadier. All these top-rank officers were involved in ordering the Bloody Sunday killings and then covering them up.

 

The cabinet of the day, led by Edward Heath, were up to their necks in it from the outset.  

 

But nobody is being held to account for anything that the British State feels it necessary to defend. Soldier F is being thrown to the wolves. He deserves it. But the rest of the wolf-pack is being allowed to slink away from the scene of the crime, not a bother on them, 

 

We shouldn’t let this happen. We shouldn’t accept just a tiny fraction of the truth.

 

What message would that send to the families of the victims of the Ballymurphy massacre, and of all of the other innocent people gunned down by State forces over the course of the Troubles?

 

The demand of the Bloody Sunday campaign for almost half a century has not been for a bit of the truth or the truth in dribs and drabs, but for the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

 

The Bloody Sunday campaign will continue for as long as it takes.